PR Manager Resume Example

Learn how to write a PR Manager resume that gets more interviews and job offers, or have Leet Resumes write it for you.

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Written by Marc Cenedella
Leading expert on resumes
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Marc Cenedella

Marc Cenedella is a nationally recognized thought leader on careers, resume writing, job search, career management and recruiting, Marc is frequently sought out by national media organizations for his expert commentary on employment, resumes, the job search and the job market.

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Last updated on September 1, 2022
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How to Write a PR Manager Resume that Gets Interviews

You spend your days editing and re-editing pitches, press releases and statements and making sure the brand’s message is being shared consistently and accurately.

While the ins and outs of your day are spent guiding everyone else’s communications, you’re a little tongue-tied now that it’s time to write your own resume.

Not to worry, we’re here to help.

We’ll show you how to use your attention to detail, excellent communication and ability to find the perfect angle to craft a PR manager resume that will land you more interviews and job offers.

Prefer to have someone else write your PR Manager resume?

That’s an option, too. The experts behind this resume example and guide can write yours for free (seriously!). Tips for a job well done are always appreciated.

What to Include in Your PR Manager Resume

There five key sections in this resume template:

  • Professional Headline
  • Summary
  • Work Experience
  • Education
  • Keywords

This article will cover what to include in each section. In the meantime, here are some tips to create an effective resume:

Keep it simple.

Press releases are straightforward and streamlined for a reason: they help journalists quickly scan through to find the releases that are newsworthy. The same goes for your resume.

The person who’s reading resumes all day isn’t going to be impressed with multiple fonts, colors and columns. In fact, those just make it more difficult to access the important information they’re looking for.

Stick to the simple, single-column format you see in the resume example and let the content of your resume do the rest.

Don’t use paragraphs.

Short and concise is the best way to keep recruiters reading your resume. Leave all paragraphs out and replace them with short phrases, lists and bullet points.

Customize.

Think of the final product from this article as a resume template. Just like you customize pitches to target specific outlets, your resume isn’t a one-size-fits all solution.

Some potential employers are looking for an emphasis on media outreach and getting as many placements as possible. Others are looking for PR strategy, brand guides and communications coaching. Don’t send the same resume to both of these job openings. Instead, customize each resume to fit the needs of each potential employer.

With a little more work at first, you’ll receive more interviews and job offers in the end.

Name + Contact

It’s a standard boilerplate, sans the bio.

Place your first and last name at the top of the page in a legible and professional font that’s slightly larger than the rest of the text.

Underneath, add your contact information: phone number, professional email address and location (city and state).

Keep your personal branding professional here and leave out any social accounts or odd personal email addresses. As you well know, appearances do matter.

Professional Headline

Your professional headline is like the subject line of an email pitch. You have three to five words to capture their attention (amongst a flood of other resumes), and make them want to read more.

Start with a slightly flattering adjective that puts you in a positive light. Nothing hyperbolic, no attention-getting antics, just a nice and honest professional adjective: results-oriented, innovative, strategic, personable, and so on.

Then add a word that highlights your level of PR experience, like: executive, senior, junior, assistant, intern, etc.

Lastly, add your official title: PR Manager.

All in all, you should have something that reads like this: Results-Oriented Senior PR Manager.

(That’s a high open-rate pitch, right there.)

Professional Summary

You’ve piqued their interest with your headline, now it’s time to align your expertise with their PR goals. The best way to do this is to use a series of lists in two to four lines (you can see this in the resume example above).

The first line will include all the job titles you’d accept as your next PR manager role. This might include Public Relations Manager, Communications Director, Executive Communications Manager, etc.

They don’t have to be roles you’ve already had, just roles you’re qualified for and interested in doing. Most importantly, include the exact job title for the job you’re applying for.

In the second line, list the most relevant skills and qualifications you have to fulfill that role. To find your angle, visit the description in the original job listing. They’ll list the kind of coverage they’re looking for, the kinds of PR projects you’ll manage and any industry-specific skills they’re targeting.

Don’t worry if you can’t fit every skill here, you can include the rest in the keywords section at the end of this resume template.

The third and fourth lines of your professional summary are optional.

Don’t try to find things to fill them. A solid two line summary is enough to land you an interview.

If you have the experience and accolades to include, add your PR achievements in line three (notable placements, projects or clients), and list any awards or promotions you’ve received in line four.

Wish someone could do the pitching for you?

Pitching yourself is an entirely different game than talking up your clients and fine-tuning executive communications. If you’d rather have the work done for you with the expertise of the resume example above, try Leet Resumes. (Also, it’s completely free – though tips are appreciated.)

Work Experience

You know what it takes to ensure all communications are representing a brand with positivity and consistency, monitoring news feeds and public sentiment and creating opportunities that bring exposure. Unfortunately, your recruiter might think PR is just about writing press releases and coaching executives at interviews.

The work experience of your resume template can debunk those myths. Instead of using this space to list the daily duties and responsibilities PR management entails, you’ll create powerful anecdotes that highlight your public relations successes. Afterall, we all know it comes down to the stories we tell.

First, list your previous work history in reverse chronological order. Add the exact job title you held, your dates of employment and your previous employer (check out the resume example for formatting tips).

For each position you include, add a bullet point list to highlight your achievements. The best way to do this is to include these three elements:

Success Verbs

Start every bullet point with a strong success verb.

Word choice is nothing new to you. Apply your concision to use verbs that imply your success before you mention any details.

Instead of managed, conducted or oversaw, success verbs like capitalized, boosted, accelerated, generated, outperformed or exceeded keep the focus on the results of your PR work.

Rather than “managed PR outreach and campaigns,” you may have, “generated 1M+ app downloads from 1 morning show placement.”

Numbers

Numbers are powerful. They’re specific and allow anyone to quickly visualize the data you’re sharing regardless of expertise or experience.

To highlight your success as a PR manager, numbers are everything. Sure, you may have boosted website traffic with an online brand exclusive, but adding numbers converts a lackluster entry into: “Boosted website traffic by 23% with one online brand exclusive story on an outlet with 10M+ UVPM.”

Try to include at least one metric for each bullet point and when you think you have enough, go back and double the amount again. Each number increases your chance for landing that interview.

Promotions

Promotions are the earned media of resumes. Rather than you saying how great your work is, someone else is saying it for you.

To any potential employer, promotions are powerful evidence of your success, your ability to meet and exceed KPIs and that you’re enjoyable enough that previous employers want to keep you around.

Education

Here, you’ll briefly and succinctly list your educational experience to provide context to the rest of your resume. There’s no need to go into detail, just include:

  • Where you attended school
  • Dates of attendance
  • Degree(s) obtained
  • Honors or awards you graduated with

Everything else, including extracurricular activities and unfinished degrees, can be left off completely.

PR Manager Keywords and Skills for a Resume

In the final section of your resume, you’ll create a customized list of keywords and skills that are targeted toward the PR manager role you’re applying for. Here are some examples to get you started:

  • Media Relations
  • Media Outreach
  • Press Releases
  • Excellent Writing Skills
  • Project Management
  • Communications Strategy
  • Crisis Management
  • Community Outreach
  • Fundraising

Once you’ve completed a custom set of PR manager keywords and skills, your resume is officially complete. Well done!

Can someone else write my resume for me?

Sure thing. Leave it to the experts and have a custom professional PR manager resume written for you. Try out Leet Resumes to see the results yourself.

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